We Are All in this Together Program

This program will begin with a short presentation for your group at the amphitheater, please schedule this when you register for your field trip. Then lead your group around the Zoo reading information about the animals as the students fill out their scavenger hunt worksheets. All worksheets and information sheets are the responsibility of the teacher; they will not be available at the Zoo the day of the field trip.

Grades 3-5 Teacher Pack

Student Worksheet

Michigan Science Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCEs) Covered:

  • S.IP.E.1 Inquiry involves generating questions, conducting investigations, and developing solutions to problems through reasoning and observation.
  • K-7 Standard S.IA: Develop an understanding that scientific inquiry and investigations require analysis and communication of findings, using appropriate technology.
  • L.OL.03.32 Identify and compare structures in animals used for controlling body temperature, support, movement, food-getting, and protection (for example: fur, wings, teeth, scales). *
  • L.EV.E.1 Environmental Adaptation - Different kinds of organisms have characteristics that help them to live in different environments.
  • L.EV.03.11 Relate characteristics and functions of observable parts in a variety of plants that allow them to live in their environment (leaf shape, thorns, odor, color). *
  • L.EV.03.12 Relate characteristics and functions of observable body parts to the ability of animals to live in their environment (sharp teeth, claws, color, body coverings). *
  • E.ES.03.43 Describe ways humans are protecting, extending, and restoring resources (recycle, reuse, reduce, renewal).
  • E.ES.03.44 Recognize that paper, metal, glass, and some plastics can be recycled.
  • L.OL.E.1 Life Requirements - Organisms have basic needs. Animals and plants need air, water, and food. Plants also require light. Plants and animals use food as a source of energy and as a source of building material for growth and repair.
    • L.OL.04.15 Determine that plants require air, water, light, and a source of energy and building material for growth and repair.
    • L.OL.04.16 Determine that animals require air, water, and a source of energy and building material for growth and repair.
  • L.EV.04.22 Identify how variations in physical characteristics of individual organisms give them an advantage for survival and reproduction.
  • L.EC.E.1 Interactions- Organisms interact in various ways including providing food and shelter to one another. Some interactions are helpful; others are harmful to the organism and other organisms.
    • L.EC.04.11 Identify organisms as part of a food chain or food web.
  • L.EV.M.1 Species Adaptation and Survival- Species with certain traits are more likely than others to survive and have offspring in particular environments. When an environment changes, the advantage or disadvantage of the species’ characteristics can change. Extinction of a species occurs when the environment changes and the characteristics of a species are insufficient to allow survival.
    • L.EV.05.11 Explain how behavioral characteristics (adaptation, instinct, learning, habit) of animals help them to survive in their environment.
    • L.EV.05.12 Describe the physical characteristics (traits) of organisms that

 

We Are All in this Together Program

This program will begin with a short presentation for your group at the amphitheater, please schedule this when you register for your field trip. Then lead your group around the Zoo reading information about the animals as the students fill out their scavenger hunt worksheets. All worksheets and information sheets are the responsibility of the teacher; they will not be available at the Zoo the day of the field trip.  

K-2 Teacher Pack

Student Worksheet

 Michigan Science Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCEs) Covered:

  • S.IP.00.11 Make purposeful observation of the natural world using the appropriate senses.
  • S.IA.00.12 Share ideas about science through purposeful conversation.
  • S.RS.00.11 Demonstrate scientific concepts through various illustrations, performances, models, exhibits, and activities.
  • L.OL.E.1 Life Requirements - Organisms have basic needs. Animals and plants need air, water, and food. Plants also require light. Plants and animals use food as a source of energy and as a source of building material for growth and repair.
    • L.OL.00.11 Identify that living things have basic needs.
    • L.OL.00.12 Identify and compare living and nonliving things.
    • L.OL.01.13 Identify the needs of animals.
  • L.HE.01.11 Identify characteristics (for example: body coverings, beak shape, number of legs, body parts) that are passed on from parents to young.
  • L.HE.E.1 Observable Characteristics- Plants and animals share many, but not all, characteristics of their parents.
    • L.HE.02.13 Identify characteristics of plants (for example: leaf shape, flower type, color, size) that are passed on from parents to young.

Welcome to our Education page!  We are pleased that you have chosen our wonderful facility for your field trip experience.

The Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square provides habitats for the animals that live here. The job of the Zoo staff is to make sure that all animals have the appropriate food, water, shelter and space to live. The Zoo also strives to educate people about animals and their habitats. You will be visiting the habitats/exhibits of many zoo animals that are in trouble in the wild (threatened, endangered, or a species of special concern) because of human impact. Their habitat is being destroyed or polluted, or they are collected for their fur or the pet trade. 

The purpose of this lesson is to provide students with educational learning opportunities in the topics of ecosystems, the role of humans in ecosystems and conservation. This program teaches us that we share the Earth with plants and animals and that we are all connected. Upon arrival at the Zoo your group will have a short presentation on group visit rules from a Zoo staff member. Then your group is free to explore the Zoo at their own pace. Worksheets and teacher references are available for you to print out and use at your discretion. The lesson is split up by grade levels, and is free with the group admission price for all school groups. 

   Grades K - 2

Grades 3 - 5 

 

The Scavenger Hunt shares the following ideas with your students during their field trip:

  • Students will be exploring the Zoo and learning about habitat, ecosystems and conservation.
  • All animals, including people, live in a habitat. Habitat consists of food, water, shelter and space.
  • Plants and animals live together in ecosystems like lakes, forests, fields, deserts, oceans, etc.
  • Human impact causes dramatic changes to the world’s ecosystems, affecting animals and their habitats.
  • We have the responsibility to care for the Earth and protect ecosystems for animals and future generations. This is called conservation.
  • The Children’s Zoo is responsible for caring for its animals by providing habitat that is appropriate for each animal.
  • The Children’s Zoo also provides education in conservation and positive action for the natural world.
    • RECYCLE ROO PROGRAM: Recycling stations are located throughout the Children’s Zoo in which bottles and cans are collected for recycling.
    • ADOPT-A-HIGHWAY: The Children’s Zoo participates in the State of Michigan highway beautification program, in which litter is removed from the side of roadways.
    • SAVE THE RAINFOREST DONATION METER: Visitors to the Children’s Zoo can give donations to help save the rainforest from habitat destruction.
    • ANNUAL CONSERVATION EVENTS: Go Wild! Earth Day Celebration; Endangered Species Day; World Ocean's Day; Birds, Bugs, Butterflies and Blooms; Zoo Boo; Arctic Zoo Fest

 

With a total of 84 gardens in the Adopt-A-Garden program it is hard to chose just one winner, so there are three.  In addition to the three winning gardens the Zoo visitors voted during the annual Birds, Bugs, Butterfly and Blooms event to pick the Peoples Choice award. 

2010 Adopt-A-Garden Winners

Bricko Brick Paving

Bricko Garden 

Saginaw Bay Underwriters

SBU Garden 

Kathy & Burris Smith

Smith Garden

2010 Peoples Choice Award Winner

 Payton & Baily Sieveke and Onie Jones

Peoples Choice Garden

2010 Honorable Mentions

  • Golfside
  • Covenant Brest Health Center
  • Jean Colpean
  • Mastromarco Law Firm
  • Delta Kappa Gamma Betta Phi Chapter
  • Douglas Family Vision
  • Forrest &Alger Family
  • Youth Outdoor Adventures
  • Judy & Ted Krawczak
  • Pat Blakeley & Joann Jastrzab

 

 

support your zoo

Without your support, the Zoo would not be able to provide the Mid-Michigan area with the safe, fun, educational and beautiful experience that it does.

In 1987, the Saginaw Valley Zoological Society formed and took over management of the Zoo from the City of Saginaw in April 1996. The City subsidy ended in 2005. The Children’s Zoo receives no tax support. The Zoo is classified as a non-profit, 501-C3 organization.

The beautiful expansions and capital improvements at the Zoo are possible because of the generous support of local foundations. The care and feeding of the animals at the Zoo and the day-to-day operations are solely funded by Zoo gate admissions and donations.

There are many ways to support the Children’s Zoo.

Memberships to the Zoo are a great way to enjoy the Zoo at tremendous savings while supporting the Zoo's programs and operating.

The Zoo welcomes donations in many forms. General donations, which also includes memory or honorary donations and train and carousel fund donations are a great way to show your support. Donations to the Zoo’s endowment fund are also encouraged, to ensure that the Zoo will be able to provide future generations with family-oriented fun and education.

Corporate donations and event sponsorship donations are also ways to help the Zoo provide the events and programs that are so popular. 

Other ways to support the Children's Zoo include purchasing Engraved Bricks, our Adopt-an-Animal program and volunteering at the Zoo. The Zoo also has a Wish List that you can help replenish.

To better secure the future of the Zoo, planned giving through a will, trust, gift annuity or life insurance is another way to be sure the Zoo is here for future generations. Tax benefits apply, so consult your financial planner.

2014 Saginaw Valley Zoological Society Board of Directors 

Officers

Elissa Basil
Chairperson
Jennifer Jaffee
Vice Chair
Michael Kelly
Recording Secretary
Tara Girard
Treasurer
Michael Colby
Immediate Past Chairperson
Judy Weldy
Board Advisor

 

Board Members

Dave Case

Julie Kozan 
Andy Friend  Carol Lechel 
Sherrie Fritze-Harris  Mary Sue Markey 
Carrie Houtman Kevin Shultz
Clay Johnson  Sandra Worner 

 

Executive Director
Nancy Parker